wanderer.
19• Louisiana
"not all who wander are lost."
wanderer.
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certifiedana:

😍🌹.. Zoo Lovin X Anastasia
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policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.
Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.
Read more | Follow policymic
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shanellbklyn:

novmbr:

shanellbklyn:

literallysame:

sweaty-weeaboo:

literallysame:

OMG ITS THE CELLPHONE GUY HE WAS AT A PRO-DARREN WILSON RALLY 


why is he wearing the same shirt.

OH MY GOD

Cause the photo was probably taken in the same day?! I mean….lol

that isn’t the same shirt though! cellphone pic had white and black stripes and the one with him holding the shirt has just white stripes. lol i don’t know why that was so important for me to clarify.

Trrruuuuu
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yagazieemezi:

Be Inspired: Kechi Okwuchi
I remember the Sosoliso plane crash. I had only been in the United States for a few months and I remember my extreme devastation on receiving news of the plane crash that took 109 lives from us. 60 of them had been students from Loyola Jesuit College in Abuja and out of the 60, Kechi Okwuchi was the only survivor. With burns covering 60% of her body and over 75 surgeries later, Kechi’s story is one of perseverance and determination. I was lucky enough to carry out a phone interview with her. I remember Kechi’s voice for the first time. It was strong, deep and with a certain sweetness to it. I interviewed Kechi in 2011 on my first blog, but her story is worth telling again.
Y: Tell me about the actual crash, if you may.
Kechi: The pilot announced that we were going to land in the airport in about 20 minutes and the plane started descending. I was in an aisle seat which is really unusual for me because I like the window so I couldn’t really see what was going on outside. Suddenly everything seemed different. We were going down way too fast. Someone in the back was shouting. It was a woman’s voice, “Is this plane trying to land?” When she said that, everyone started panicking. I looked to the side to my friend and she was looking really scared and I was probably looking just as scared.  So we held hands and tried to pray, but before we could even start to say, “In Jesus’ name”, there was this really loud, searing sound right in my ear and the next thing I knew, I woke up in the hospital.
Y: Understand that you don’t have to answer any of my questions, but how did you deal with the loss of your friends and the other people you knew on the plane?
Kechi: Well at that point when I woke up in the hospital, I automatically assumed that since I was alive, everyone else was alive too. I was told by the psychiatrist in the hospital 4 months later that I was the only survivor of all the students and only one of two survivors of the entire flight. I cried a whole lot. I was devastated. The first person I could think of was my friend Toke Bagru, the girl that was sitting beside me because she was my closest friend. She was the first person I thought of because she had been the last face I had seen before the crash. My mother was there with me the whole time, she’s my rock. She let me cry everything out. I still cry, but I don’t like the idea of being constantly sad about it. If I stay sad and constantly depressed, it’s an insult to their memory. I want to live my life to the fullest, not just for myself, but for them too. 
Read full interview
Website / Facebook / Twitter 
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Be Inspired: Kechi Okwuchi
I remember the Sosoliso plane crash. I had only been in the United States for a few months and I remember my extreme devastation on receiving news of the plane crash that took 109 lives from us. 60 of them had been students from Loyola Jesuit College in Abuja and out of the 60, Kechi Okwuchi was the only survivor. With burns covering 60% of her body and over 75 surgeries later, Kechi’s story is one of perseverance and determination. I was lucky enough to carry out a phone interview with her. I remember Kechi’s voice for the first time. It was strong, deep and with a certain sweetness to it. I interviewed Kechi in 2011 on my first blog, but her story is worth telling again.
Y: Tell me about the actual crash, if you may.
Kechi: The pilot announced that we were going to land in the airport in about 20 minutes and the plane started descending. I was in an aisle seat which is really unusual for me because I like the window so I couldn’t really see what was going on outside. Suddenly everything seemed different. We were going down way too fast. Someone in the back was shouting. It was a woman’s voice, “Is this plane trying to land?” When she said that, everyone started panicking. I looked to the side to my friend and she was looking really scared and I was probably looking just as scared.  So we held hands and tried to pray, but before we could even start to say, “In Jesus’ name”, there was this really loud, searing sound right in my ear and the next thing I knew, I woke up in the hospital.
Y: Understand that you don’t have to answer any of my questions, but how did you deal with the loss of your friends and the other people you knew on the plane?
Kechi: Well at that point when I woke up in the hospital, I automatically assumed that since I was alive, everyone else was alive too. I was told by the psychiatrist in the hospital 4 months later that I was the only survivor of all the students and only one of two survivors of the entire flight. I cried a whole lot. I was devastated. The first person I could think of was my friend Toke Bagru, the girl that was sitting beside me because she was my closest friend. She was the first person I thought of because she had been the last face I had seen before the crash. My mother was there with me the whole time, she’s my rock. She let me cry everything out. I still cry, but I don’t like the idea of being constantly sad about it. If I stay sad and constantly depressed, it’s an insult to their memory. I want to live my life to the fullest, not just for myself, but for them too. 
Read full interview
Website / Facebook / Twitter 
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
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gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤ 
gradientlair:


women of African descent they NEVER show you…

Beauty. ❤